New report on the use of music in the health care system (in Danish)

Major mapping: Use of music in healthcare

 

Are the forces of music used constructively in the Danish healthcare system? DJBFA and researchers from Aalborg University in collaboration with the Danish Sound Network have mapped the use of music in the Danish healthcare system. The study is the largest of its kind in Denmark.

Music does something to us humans. It calls on all our emotions and makes them flow freely. It creates joy and evokes sadness, and music can bind us together in a special sense of community when we create or listen to it together. Many of us have experienced this. But are the forces of music used constructively in the Danish healthcare system? DJBFA asked researchers at NOCKS - North Jutland Center for Culture and Health at Aalborg University to investigate this question.

The study is the largest of its kind so far in Denmark. A total of 315 senior nurses, spread over 24 hospitals across the country's five regions, participated, as well as all Danish hospices.

Random use of music

The result is that music is used haphazardly without consistent overall decisions in the hospitals. And the Danes thus lose an important component for prevention or as part of a disease treatment. Even a component without side effects. On the other hand, Danish hospices have embraced music and work focused and professionally with it in their treatments.

Hospitals

3 out of 4 hospitals have one or more music initiatives. Unfortunately, it is by far the most common that those patients can listen to their own music on tablet or smartphone, while the focused effort is only to find approx. 1/3 of the places. However, there is a big difference from region to region. It looks best in Region North Jutland (where only 15% have no music initiatives), while the “worst” is Region Zealand (36% have no initiatives). The vast majority of initiatives are aimed at "distraction / entertainment", "relaxation and anxiety reduction" and "stress reduction". The conclusion is that the effort is random and unfocused. There is thus plenty of potential for improvement.

hospice

3/4 of all hospices have hired a music educator or a definite musician. In general, they work a lot with music and therefore offer their patients and relatives a varied range of music. Ex. offers 80% of hospice singing (ceremony for relatives when a patient has passed away) and 75% occasional music events and 70% music therapy. The conclusion is that Danish hospices work professionally with music and take advantage of the benefits that are. It would be positive if the last hospices implemented the use of music.

 
About the mapping

Researchers from Aalborg University, together with the country's largest composers' association DJBFA and with financial support from the Danish Sound Network and the Ministry of Education and Research, have investigated how music is used in the health care system. The report has been prepared by Anita Jensen and Johanne Bøgh Nielsen.

Download the report
Use of music in the Danish healthcare system - great report.

Use of music in the Danish healthcare system - abbreviated version.

Read Politiken's entire article on mapping
HERE

About the mapping

Researchers from Aalborg University, together with the country's largest composers' association DJBFA and with financial support from the Danish Sound Network and the Ministry of Education and Research, have investigated how music is used in the health care system. The report has been prepared by Anita Jensen and Johanne Bøgh Nielsen.

Download the report
Use of music in the Danish healthcare system - great report.

Use of music in the Danish healthcare system - abbreviated version.

Read Politiken's entire article on mapping
HERE

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